Performing Calculations: What is 80% Of 8?

Performing Calculations: What is 80% Of 8?

Chances are, you use math dealing with percentages on a regular basis without even realizing it! From calculating tips at restaurants, to sales prices at your favorite stores, to interest rates on loans. Understanding how to calculate percentages is an invaluable life skill.

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll walk through how to calculate 80% of 8 step-by-step using different methods. We’ll cover formulas, decimals, fractions, visual representations with pie charts, and more. Our goal is to illustrate the concept seven different ways to give you a complete grasp of calculating 80% of any number.

By the end, you’ll be a percent whiz able to effortlessly find 80% of 8 or any other number!

Understanding Percentages

Let’s start with some key terminology that will be helpful to know moving forward:

Percentage – A fraction or ratio with 100 as the denominator (bottom number). Denoted with the percent symbol %.

Percent – Out of 100. For example, 80% means 80 out of 100.

Whole – The original or total number. In our case, the whole is 8.

Part – The portion we’re taking. For this article, we’re finding 80% of 8. The part will be 80% of the whole.

Real-world examples can help conceptualize working with percentages. Here’s a few relatable ones:

  • Calculating a 15% tip on your restaurant bill
  • Figuring out 60% off prices during sales at your favorite clothing boutique
  • Determining 25% interest when taking out a loan or credit card

As you can see, having solid conceptual knowledge of percentages serves us well in everyday situations!

Formula Method

Now onto calculating 80% of 8 step-by-step. We’ll start with the most common and straightforward formula method.

The formula looks like:

(Whole x Percent) ÷ 100 = Part

Let’s plug our numbers into this equation:

  • Whole = 8
  • Percent = 80%
  • Part = ? (what we’re solving for)

(8 x 80) ÷ 100 = Part

Work it out:

  • 8 x 80 = 640
  • 640 ÷ 100 = 6.4

Therefore, 80% of 8 = 6.4

The formula method is great because you can use it to find any percent of any whole number. Let’s try a few more examples:

  • 60% of 20
  • Whole = 20
  • Percent = 60%
  • (20 x 60) ÷ 100 = 12
  • 10% of 50
  • Whole = 50
  • Percent = 10%
  • (50 x 10) ÷ 100 = 5

See – with this formula you can calculate any percent!

Converting to a Decimal

Here’s another method you can use to make solving percentages even simpler: converting the percentage to a decimal.

Because percent literally means “per 100”, we can represent 80% as a decimal like this:

80 ÷ 100 = 0.8

So 80% as a decimal is 0.8

(Sometimes decimals can be easier to work with than fractions, so this is a handy trick).

Now our formula becomes:

Whole x Decimal = Part

Plugging in our numbers:

  • Whole = 8
  • Decimal (80%) = 0.8
  • Part = ?
  • 8 x 0.8 = 6.4

Once again, we get the same solution that 80% of 8 is 6.4

Let’s practice with a few more examples:

  • 60% of 20
  • 60% as decimal = 0.6
  • Whole = 20
  • 20 x 0.6 = 12
  • 25% of 16
  • 25% as decimal = 0.25
  • Whole = 16
  • 16 x 0.25 = 4

Converting percentages to decimals first eliminates the need to divide by 100 each time!

Fractions Method

Solving percentages with fractions is an excellent way to conceptualize what finding 80% of 8 truly entails.

Let’s break it down:

  • 80%
  • We know percent means “out of 100”
  • So 80% means 80/100
  • Of 8
  • The number we’re taking 80% of

We can set this up as a fraction:

Part / 8 = 80 / 100

  • Part = What we’re solving for (80% of 8)
  • 8 = Whole number
  • 80/100 = 80%

Now cross multiply:

  • 100 x Part = 80 x 8
  • Part = 640/100
  • Part = 6.4

Using fractions provides an insightful visual for determining percentages. You’re literally showing that 80 out of 100 portions of any whole number!

Let’s look at one more examples:

  • 50% of 10
  • Part / 10 = 50 / 100
  • 100 x Part = 50 x 10
  • Part = 5

Fractions lend themselves nicely to conceptualizing percentages word problems too.

Suppose a class contains 8 students. The teacher announces 80% of the class passed the exam. How many students passed?

Translate this to fractions:

  • Part / 8 = 80 / 100
  • Part = 6.4

Therefore, 6 students passed the exam.

Fractions help illustrate what the words are asking you to determine. Give them a try next time you come across an unfamiliar percentage scenario!

Visual Representation with a Pie Chart

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Well pie charts perfectly visually convey percentages!

Let’s illustrate 80% of 8 using a pie chart.

  • The whole pie represents 8.
  • 80% of 8 will be 80% of the pie.
  • The remainder will be 20% of the pie.

Here’s what that looks like:

[Insert pie chart with 8 slices, 6.4 slices colored in blue to represent 80%, 1.6 slices in red to represent 20%]

The pie contains 8 total slices to represent the whole (8).

80% of 8 is 6.4. So the blue portion covers 6.4 slices.

The red represents the remainder (what is not the 80% piece). 8 – 6.4 = 1.6 slices.

Pie charts provide an instantly recognizable portrayals of percentages that transcend language barriers. While the methods up to this point focused on calculations, visuals appeal to our intuitive sense of sizes and proportions.

Let’s try another example – say you’re saving money and 40% of your $50 paycheck goes into your savings account. How much are you saving each pay period?

  • Whole paycheck = $50
  • 40% of paycheck going to savings
  • Create a 10 slice pie chart since $50 can easily be split into 10 $5 slices
  • 40% of pie should be savings
  • 40% of 10 slices is 4 slices
  • 4 x $5 per slice = $20 saved

As you can see, pie charts bring percentages to life!

How Can Understanding Calculations Help in Operating Modern Machinery?

Having insight into calculations can make a big difference when operating modern machinery. Understanding the numbers and equations involved can lead to more efficient and precise operations. With the right knowledge, operators can talk confidently about the intricacies of modern machinery and ensure it is used to its full potential.

Determining What is NOT the Percentage

Let’s change gears – instead of finding 80% of 8, what is not the 80%?

Basically, we want to determine the remainder.

  • We know:
  • Whole amount is 8
  • 80% of 8 is 6.4 (We solved this earlier).
  • So what is the non-80% portion?
  • Well, if 80% of 8 is 6.4…
  • Then the remainder must be 8 – 6.4 = 1.6

Therefore, 20% of 8 is 1.6.

Pie charts make this really clear:

  • The whole pie is 8 slices
  • 80% (6.4 slices) are blue
  • The red part is what’s not the 80%
  • So the red is 1.6 slices
  • Which represents 20% of 8

Let’s look at another example:

  • Whole amount is 16
  • 75% of 16 = ?
  • Solve this first using previous methods:
  • 75% as decimal is 0.75
  • 16 x 0.75 = 12
  • Therefore, 75% of 16 is 12
  • So what’s the remainder?
  • 16 (whole)
  • – 12 (75% piece)
  • = 4
  • 4 represents 25% of 16

Knowing how to calculate the remainder percentage helps build overall percent fluency!

Putting it All Together

We’ve covered a multitude of methods to comprehensively illustrate 80% of 8:

  • Formula: Whole x Percent ÷ 100
  • Decimal Conversion
  • Fractions
  • Visual representations with pie charts
  • Determining outside pieces

Learning multiple approaches gives you flexibility to tackle any percent question!

Let’s summarize the key things you now know:

  • 80% of 8 is 6.4
  • Fractions help visualize part/whole relationships
  • Pie charts instantly portray percentages
  • Finding 100% – the percentage = the remainder piece
  • Confidently calculate any percentage of any number using formulas

Plus, you’ve had lots of examples practicing these methods with other percentages and whole numbers beyond just 80% of 8.

Understanding percentages is crucial for real world math literacy – now you have all the tools in your belt! What questions do you still have? What other percentage practice would you like to see? Let me know in the comments!

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